Hidden Costs Of Not Owning An Espresso Maker

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I find myself having one conversation, in particular, with customers all the time. The conversation starts off with something similar to, “I’m tired of waiting in line at the local café, before work, only to end up paying $4 for my coffee.” Many customers have already done the math: 2 lattes a day, at a cost of $4 a drink, add up to $8 a day. You could easily be spending $56 a week, just on coffee!

We all know that you can buy a top-of-the-line espresso machine that will pay for itself in less than a year. I’ll also add that, once you get the hang of home brewing, odds are, you’ll end up with a much better cup of Joe than the one you’d get from the local coffee shop. Most of our customers agree with this sentiment.

What many people do not consider is the amount of time you’d save when you skip the café lines, in favor of brewing your beverages at home. Chances are, you are running, or should I say driving, to get your coffee in the morning. Maybe you also sneak out, on your lunch break, for a refill. I’ve done a bit of research on this topic and have come up with some real numbers on just how long this transaction takes:

First, I went to the coffee shop nearest to me, which was only a four-minute drive. I left my house at 6:05AM and arrived at my destination at 6:09AM. At the time, the shop wasn’t that busy and there was only one person in line in front of me. I ordered a simple café Americano, which was promptly prepared for me. It only took five minutes, from the time I exited my car, in the parking lot, before I had a hot beverage in my hand. The coffee run lasted nine minutes from, start to finish, including the drive from my house…not bad.

I made a second run to same shop the next day, but left a little later this time, at 7:15AM. There was a little more traffic and it took me seven minutes to reach my destination. Once I got there, the major difference, at this time of day, was the long line of people waiting to get coffee; there were 11 people in front of me. With two employees making drinks, it took 10 minutes to get my café Americano. This trip took 17 minutes, from start to finish, almost double the amount of time from my first experience.

My third trial was done during the middle of the work day, at 1PM. The shop is only five minutes away from my office. When I got there, three people were already in line in front of me. This time, it took six minutes to get my café Americano. The total time for this visit was 11 minutes.

The fourth, and final, experiment involved my wife getting her afternoon iced beverage at 4PM. According to her calculations, it took seven minutes to get there. She got her “Frappuccino” in five minutes, with only one person in line in front of her. The entire trip took her 12 minutes.

Based on four experiments, it took an average of 12 minutes to get a drink at the local coffee shop. Not too bad, but it starts to get scary when I begin to add up the trips: 12 minutes a trip, five times a week, 52 weeks a year…that adds up to an astonishing 52 hours a year! (The calculations get even worse for people who have coffee twice a day or on weekends.) Again, that’s at least 52 hours of your life every year, spent just waiting for coffee.

Consider that when you have your own espresso machine, you are making your drinks from the convenience and comfort of your own home. And, then there is the obvious: buying your coffee at the local café often ends up costing a small fortune in the course of a year. Do yourself a favor, get an espresso machine; skip the lines and the bills. If you’re intimidated by the brewing process, don’t be! Most home users hone their skills pretty quickly and end up making better beverages than the big coffee shops in town.

See my blog, "Save Time With An Espresso Machine" to find out how long it will take you to brew a beverage using a semi-automatic or super automatic espresso machine.

Darren

Sales Department

Categories Coffee and Espresso

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